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American College of Cardiology honors MD2K’s Abraham

Posted March 28, 2017

Dr. William T. Abraham, who leads the MD2K investigation on novel mobile sensor-based approaches to reducing readmission among congestive heart failure patients, is the 2017 Distinguished Scientist Award-Clinical Domain by the American College of Cardiology. The award recognizes Dr. Abraham’s contributions to the cardiovascular profession.

Dr. Abraham is director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The award was announced during the convocation ceremony at ACC’s 66th Annual Scientific Session & Expo held March 17-19 in Washington, D.C.

“I am deeply honored by the receipt of this special award, which is conferred on an individual who has made major scientific contributions to the advancement of scientific knowledge in the field of cardiovascular disease,” Dr. Abraham said. “In reality, these contributions represent the work of many individuals working together as a team, to advance clinical science and improve patient care and clinical outcomes. Through the MD2K team, I hope to continue to better the lives of heart failure patients through the development of novel technologies and approaches.”

In his role at MD2K, Dr. Abraham oversees MD2K’s studies of congestive heart failure patients with a goal of using non-invasive mobile sensor data to identify fluid buildup on the heart before it becomes severe enough to require hospitalization. A study is currently underway at Ohio State.

“We are very proud of Dr. Abraham’s growing recognition as one of America’s premier cardiologists and very fortunate to have him lead congestive heart failure work at MD2K that seeks to define new frontiers in managing cardiovascular patients in their natural field environment.”

The American College of Cardiology, which has 52,000 members, is a medical society dedicated to transforming cardiovascular care and improving heart health.